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"Flurry’s analytics platform, because it’s run on thousands of different applications worldwide, is…"

“Flurry’s analytics platform, because it’s run on thousands of different applications worldwide, is able to measure data such as OS, location, and engagement. In its data, Flurry has discerned that a group of about 50 devices are running the yet-unreleased iPhone OS 3.2 software, all of which have been geographically pinpointed to be located on Apple’s main Cupertino, CA campus.”

New Apple Tablet Evidence Surfaces: Around 50 Test Devices Identified

iPhones, Mashable.  They’re called iPhones.

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This is not social media news, Mashable.

This is not social media news, Mashable.

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You’re too lazy to make a personal brand

It’s hard to make a personal brand.  Take it from me.  I’ve been using the internet for over a decade, and I’m still number two on Google, and I’ve tried my damnedest to be number one.

With things such as search engine optimization and shameless whoring self-promotion, you can bump yourself up in Google’s rankings.  But that’s only going to do so much.  You can tweak the system, claim your identity as much as you want, but there’s still something missing from all that to make yourself number one.

To make a good personal brand, you have to consistently turn out amazing work.  Not mediocre, not good, but AMAZING.

And that is hard as hell.

You have to do it every day.  You have to be likeable.  Even worse, you want this to happen online, so you better work your ass off on the internet.  You’ve got to be smart, timely, and worst of all, social.

This isn’t fun and games.  It’s hard work.  You’ve already got a great life.  Why do you need to work your ass off for a slice of online glory?

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The Dark Side of Blogging

The Dark Side of Blogging:

Unfortunately, this interview isn’t about how Darth Vader blogs.  It isn’t even about how Wendy Piersall fell into a world of sex, drugs, and ones and zeros.  However, Wendy makes a good point about how fame is completely useless without some kind of return on investment, like, you know, oodles of cash.

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"When Apple unveils iPhone 4.0 software (still just a rumor) next week, we might be getting…"

“When Apple unveils iPhone 4.0 software (still just a rumor) next week, we might be getting multitasking/background running applications, multi-touch support OS-wide, UI changes, and contact and calendar sync options, according to Boy Genuis Report.”

Reading this quote might make you think I’m just railing on Mashable more. Frankly, I am.  This sentence rambles on, has too many clauses, and hinges on the fact that it’s all rumor.  It’s all wishes, dreams, and bullshit until Apple reveals whatever it is revealing, which at this point could be a flying saucer.

However, what really kills me about this post is how this isn’t really news as much as it is throwing up someone’s rumors.  It’s a bad way to blog because it shows you can’t think on your own.  You aren’t inspired by other ideas; you regurgitate them.

The one saving grace of this article is this paragraph:

For smartphone users, the feature [background apps] is killer because you can have multiple applications running at the same time and simply switch between them without having to exit out. Multitasking means instant updates from applications that are running, but not in use.

These sentences sum up why the feature is important to any bozo who happens to stumble across the article in a clear, concise, and FACTUAL manner.  It’s the moment when you realize “Oh, the author might know what she is talking about without quoting a source.”  The author sounds like an authority on the matter, rather than a high school student desperate to write a paper at 4 am.

What have we learned here?

  • It’s OK to speculate and dream, but be clear none of it is fact.
  • Blog as much original content as possible.
  • Write concisely and authoritatively so any moron can understand.
  • Spell “Genius” correctly.

Quoted from “iPhone 4.0 to Support Background-Running Apps [Rumor]

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It’s Good to be Negative One thing that drives me nuts…

It’s Good to be Negative

One thing that drives me nuts about a lot of social media fanatics is that there is an overwhelming drive to always be positive.  Poor folks like me, who are inherently depressive and negative, get shut out of the space as “Debbie Downers.”

It’s OK to be negative.  Be critical.  Point out the flaws.  Show your misgivings.

Things get better when multiple points of view are shared, and sometimes you need to have the view that the world is a festering hellhole to make things better.

Just don’t be a total asshole when you do it.

(Video: Internet Bridge Troll via College Humor)

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This is not Social Media News, Mashable.

This is not Social Media News, Mashable.

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An open letter to Facebook.

Hi Facebook.  We need to talk.  Seriously talk.  None of this “My crops need fertilizing” or “such as so likes this”, but real talk.

I’m sick of your twisted “suggestions.”

—-

Let’s have quick walk down memory lane.

I joined “The Facebook” in 2004.  Remember your definite article? Remember the guy?  They were there too.  I joined when I was in college, when THE Facebook was ONLY for colleges.  Wasn’t that a crazy time?  College students could find other students at their school with similar interests, and then we could meet each other. Crazy, isn’t it?

Then you opened up to High School Students, and we all whined.  Why would you let those little brats in with us, cool hip nearly twenty somethings and people with access to college e-mail addresses?  Then you opened up to everyone, and we all whined again, but you ignored us.  Slowly, all hell broke loose.

—-

It’s bad enough I have to deal with friends who invite me to every single one of their events even though I’m not within 1,000 miles of them.  Or my other friends who fill my news feed with apps so shady not even the sun can shine through them.  I can deal with my stupid friends, I made the choice to connect with hem.  What I can’t deal with is your servers trying to play stupid cupid.

I realize that you get money from displaying those ads on EVERY SINGLE page I look at.  And I know you aren’t above giving all that precious data away about me and my friends’ interests to make a buck.  And every connection I make, every app I waste time in, is just another way to earn another dollar.

So, let’s get down to business Facebook, because these “suggestions” are really ways to make a killing business opportunities.  The more time I spend on your site, the more ads I see, the more chance I might click on one of them, and then you get paid and you’re a happy website.

Me on the other hand, I’m losing faith in the little online world I’ve set up.  I’m sick your servers desperately searching for another dollar to keep them alive and feed your coffers.  There’s only so much creepiness I can take before I ditch Facebook for another social network that might be a little more subtle about stealing my time, content, and personal information to make money.

Let this letter stand as a warning.

And one last thing Facebook.  Remember when MySpace was king, and everyone wondered what the deal was with the tiny, clean competitor called Facebook?  On the web usability, content, and transparency are king.  No one, not even Facebook, is safe.